Standard Egg Grading And Egg Storage – Hotel Kitchen

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Hotel Standard for Egg Grading and Egg Storage

The Grading of eggs is based on several factors. There are four grades of eggs that the cook and baker are concerned with AA, A, B, and C. The age and handling of the gg are the primary determinants of quality. As an egg ages, the white becomes thin and the air cell between the membrane and the shell enlarges. The yolk membrane becomes thinner as the egg ages. This results in a yolk that spreads more and breaks easily.

Appearance is not the only thing that is affected as the egg ages. When white thins the albumin protein has lost part of its ability to build and maintain the structure. It will not develop as great a volume when beaten. The stability of the beaten white will be less. The thickening and emulsifying power of the yolk are also reduced significantly.

The best grade (AA) has a firm yolk and white that stand up high when broken onto a flat surface and do not spread over a large area. In the shell, the yolk is well-centered, and the air sac is small. As eggs age, they lose density. The thin part of the white becomes larger, and the egg spreads over a larger area when broken. Also, the air sac becomes larger as the egg loses moisture through the shell. In any case, slow deterioration in quality goes on as long as eggs are stored, SO PROMT USE IS THE BEST USE and always follow the FIFO method.

Standard Egg Description:

1. AA Grade Egg:

The term "AA grade egg" typically refers to a grading system for eggs based on their quality and size. Egg grading is a process used to classify eggs according to various factors, including size, cleanliness, and shell quality. The grading system may vary from country to country, but in general, it includes grades like AA, A, and B.

In the United States, for example, the grading scale for eggs is as follows:

AA (Extra Large): These eggs have thick, firm whites and high, round yolks. The shells are clean and without cracks.
A (Large): These eggs have characteristics similar to AA grade but may have slightly lower interior quality.
B (Medium): These eggs may have thinner whites, flatter yolks, and may not meet the standards of AA or A grades. They are often used in processed egg products.
It's important to note that the grading system primarily focuses on the internal and external quality of the eggs and does not necessarily indicate nutritional content. When purchasing eggs, you can choose the grade based on your preferences and intended use, keeping in mind that higher-grade eggs are generally preferred for recipes where egg appearance and texture matter.

Always check the egg carton for the grading information and ensure that the eggs are within their expiration date for optimal freshness and safety.

The term “AA grade egg” typically refers to a grading system for eggs based on their quality and size. Egg grading is a process used to classify eggs according to various factors, including size, cleanliness, and shell quality. The grading system may vary from country to country, but in general, it includes grades like AA, A, and B.

In the United States, for example, the grading scale for eggs is as follows:

  1. AA (Extra Large): These eggs have thick, firm whites and high, round yolks. The shells are clean and without cracks.
  2. A (Large): These eggs have characteristics similar to AA grade but may have slightly lower interior quality.
  3. B (Medium): These eggs may have thinner whites, flatter yolks, and may not meet the standards of AA or A grades. They are often used in processed egg products.

It’s important to note that the grading system primarily focuses on the internal and external quality of the eggs and does not necessarily indicate nutritional content. When purchasing eggs, you can choose the grade based on your preferences and intended use, keeping in mind that higher-grade eggs are generally preferred for recipes where egg appearance and texture matter.

Always check the egg carton for the grading information and ensure that the eggs are within their expiration date for optimal freshness and safety.

They are suitable for any type of use. They are preferred for poaching, frying, and cooking the shell.

  • Shell: Clean; unbroken, practically normal.
  • Air cell: 1/8 inch or less in depth; practically regular.
  • White: Clear, firm, “upright”.
  • Yolk: Well centred; outline slightly defined; free from defects.

2. A Grade Egg:

an "A grade egg" typically refers to eggs that meet certain quality standards. The grading system for eggs can vary by country, but generally, the "A" grade signifies eggs of good quality. Here's a general overview based on the United States grading system:

A (Large): These eggs have a good, standard quality. The whites are reasonably firm, the yolks are fairly round, and the shells are clean without cracks.
Egg grading takes into account factors such as the size, quality of the egg white and yolk, and the cleanliness and integrity of the eggshell. The grading is usually performed by candling, where the eggs are inspected with the help of a light source to examine the interior.

It's worth noting that this grading system focuses on the internal and external quality of the eggs and doesn't necessarily reflect the nutritional content. If you're buying eggs for specific culinary purposes where the appearance and texture of the eggs matter, you might want to choose higher-grade eggs. Always check the egg carton for the grading information and make sure to use or consume eggs before their expiration date for the best quality and safety.

an “A grade egg” typically refers to eggs that meet certain quality standards. The grading system for eggs can vary by country, but generally, the “A” grade signifies eggs of good quality. Here’s a general overview based on the United States grading system:

  • A (Large): These eggs have a good, standard quality. The whites are reasonably firm, the yolks are fairly round, and the shells are clean without cracks.

Egg grading takes into account factors such as the size, quality of the egg white and yolk, and the cleanliness and integrity of the eggshell. The grading is usually performed by candling, where the eggs are inspected with the help of a light source to examine the interior.

It’s worth noting that this grading system focuses on the internal and external quality of the eggs and doesn’t necessarily reflect the nutritional content. If you’re buying eggs for specific culinary purposes where the appearance and texture of the eggs matter, you might want to choose higher-grade eggs. Always check the egg carton for the grading information and make sure to use or consume eggs before their expiration date for the best quality and safety.

  • Shell: Clean; unbroken, practically normal
  • Air cell: 2/8 inch or less in depth; practically regular
  • White: Clear, may be reasonably firm
  • Yolk: Maybe fairly well-centered; outline fairly well-defined; practically free from defects

3. B Grade Egg:

In the context of egg grading, a "B grade egg" typically represents eggs that may not meet the same quality standards as A grade eggs. The grading system can vary by country, but in the United States, for example, B grade eggs are generally considered to have lower quality compared to A grade eggs. Here's a general overview:

B (Medium): These eggs may have thinner whites, flatter yolks, or other characteristics that don't meet the standards of A or AA grade eggs. While they may be perfectly fine for consumption, they are often used in processed egg products rather than sold as fresh eggs.
It's important to note that the grading system primarily assesses the internal and external quality of eggs and does not necessarily reflect their nutritional content. B grade eggs are typically less preferred for uses where appearance and texture matter, such as baking or making dishes where the egg's qualities are more noticeable.

When purchasing eggs, it's advisable to check the carton for the grading information and ensure that the eggs are within their expiration date for optimal freshness and safety.

In the context of egg grading, a “B grade egg” typically represents eggs that may not meet the same quality standards as A grade eggs. The grading system can vary by country, but in the United States, for example, B grade eggs are generally considered to have lower quality compared to A grade eggs. Here’s a general overview:

  • B (Medium): These eggs may have thinner whites, flatter yolks, or other characteristics that don’t meet the standards of A or AA grade eggs. While they may be perfectly fine for consumption, they are often used in processed egg products rather than sold as fresh eggs.

It’s important to note that the grading system primarily assesses the internal and external quality of eggs and does not necessarily reflect their nutritional content. B grade eggs are typically less preferred for uses where appearance and texture matter, such as baking or making dishes where the egg’s qualities are more noticeable.

When purchasing eggs, it’s advisable to check the carton for the grading information and ensure that the eggs are within their expiration date for optimal freshness and safety.

  • Shell: clean to slightly stained; unbroken, may be slightly abnormal.
  • Air cell: 3/8 inch or less in-depth, may be free but not bubbly.
  • White: clear, maybe slightly weak.
  • Yolk: may be off-centre, outline well defined, maybe slightly enlarged and fattened, and may show definite but not serious defects.

4. C Grade Egg:

It's worth noting that in many grading systems, including those in the United States, there is no standard category for "C grade eggs." The grading typically goes up to A or AA for fresh eggs, with B grade eggs being of slightly lower quality. The grading criteria usually focus on factors like the size, cleanliness, and quality of the egg whites and yolks.

However, in some cases, the term "C grade" might be informally used to refer to eggs that have defects or are not suitable for retail sale. These eggs may have broken or cracked shells, abnormal shapes, or other issues that make them less marketable. Such eggs are often diverted to be used in processed egg products or may be sold at a lower price.

It's essential to note that egg grading practices can vary by region and country, so it's always a good idea to check local regulations or industry standards for the most accurate information regarding egg grades in a specific location. Additionally, consumers are encouraged to check egg cartons for grading information and choose eggs that meet their preferences and intended use.

It’s worth noting that in many grading systems, including those in the United States, there is no standard category for “C grade eggs.” The grading typically goes up to A or AA for fresh eggs, with B grade eggs being of slightly lower quality. The grading criteria usually focus on factors like the size, cleanliness, and quality of the egg whites and yolks.

However, in some cases, the term “C grade” might be informally used to refer to eggs that have defects or are not suitable for retail sale. These eggs may have broken or cracked shells, abnormal shapes, or other issues that make them less marketable. Such eggs are often diverted to be used in processed egg products or may be sold at a lower price.

It’s essential to note that egg grading practices can vary by region and country, so it’s always a good idea to check local regulations or industry standards for the most accurate information regarding egg grades in a specific location. Additionally, consumers are encouraged to check egg cartons for grading information and choose eggs that meet their preferences and intended use.

Grade C, eggs have a cracked and/or stained shell, a flattened yolk, or a watery white. These eggs are only used in the production of processed egg products.

  • Shell: clean to moderately stained, unbroken, may be abnormal.
  • Air cell: may be over 3/8 inch in depth, may be free or bubbly.
  • White: may be weak and watery, small blood clots or spots may be present.
  • Yolk: may be off-centre, enlarged, and flattened, may show clearly visible germ development but no blood; may show other serious defects; outline may be visible.
 CLASSIFICATIONMIN Wt./EGG
JUMBO30 OZ / 70 gm
EXTRA LARGE27 OZ / 63 gm
LARGE24 OZ / 56 gm
MEDIUM21 OZ / 49 gm
SMALL18 OZ / 42 gm
PEE WEE15 OZ / 35 gm

Storage and Handling of Egg:

Proper storage and handling of eggs are crucial to ensure their safety and maintain their quality. Here are some guidelines for storing and handling eggs:

Storage:

  1. Refrigeration: Eggs should be stored in the refrigerator at a temperature of 40°F (4°C) or lower. The cold temperature helps prevent the growth of bacteria.
  2. Carton Storage: Store eggs in their original carton to protect them from absorbing odors and flavors from other foods in the refrigerator. The carton also helps prevent the eggs from picking up bacteria.
  3. Avoid Temperature Fluctuations: Keep the refrigerator temperature consistent, as temperature fluctuations can affect the quality of eggs.

Handling:

  1. Wash Hands: Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water before and after handling eggs to prevent the spread of bacteria.
  2. Inspect Eggs: Check eggs for cracks or damage before purchasing and using them. Avoid buying or using eggs with cracked shells, as bacteria can enter through cracks.
  3. Use By Date: Consume eggs before their “use by” or expiration date. This ensures freshness and reduces the risk of consuming spoiled eggs.
  4. Separate Raw and Cooked Foods: Avoid cross-contamination by keeping raw eggs, their shells, and utensils separate from cooked foods. Use different cutting boards for raw eggs and other ingredients.
  5. Cook Eggs Thoroughly: Cooking eggs thoroughly helps kill any potential harmful bacteria. For example, cook eggs until both the whites and yolks are firm for fried or boiled eggs.
  6. Store Cooked Eggs Safely: If you cook extra eggs, refrigerate them within two hours of cooking. Use cooked eggs within 3-4 days.
  7. Avoid Raw or Undercooked Eggs: Avoid consuming raw or undercooked eggs, especially for individuals who are more susceptible to foodborne illnesses, such as pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems.
  8. Don’t Wash Eggs Before Refrigeration: It’s generally recommended not to wash eggs before storing them. The protective coating on the eggshell helps to prevent bacteria from entering the egg. If washing is necessary, do it just before using the eggs.

By following these storage and handling guidelines, you can reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses associated with eggs and ensure that you are using them at their best quality.

The Protection of the egg is of great importance. When improperly handled, its properties as an ingredient and independent food item are impaired. Remember that eggs lose quality quickly at room temperature and they should be always stored at 36 degrees F to 46 degrees F.

And because eggs have porous shells, which allow air to enter the shell. They should be stored away from foods that may pass on undesirable odors. The eggs are best stored in the case to prevent moisture loss. Eggs should only be frozen out of the shell and when not needed immediately. 

The egg should be stored in the refrigerator in their cartoon to maintain maximum freshness and to avoid absorbing other food odors through their porous shells with the pointed end down. Cool place 0-5 C (32-41 F) Away from possible contaminants such as raw meat. Always follow the First in first out method. Hands should be washed before and after handling Eggs.

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